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Important: This information is collected from a variety of sources and is presented as general thoughts about the breed. It is sugggested that you use our information with that of your own to make any decisions. We suggest you DO NOT make any decisions about a family pet based solely on these pages. Keep digging!


Breed:

Harrier

Group (AKC):

Hound

Country of OriginGreat Britain
Type of coatShort and hard.
GroomingMinimal coat care is required. A routine rubdown with a harsh cloth and massage will release dead hairs. Keep ears clean and nails trimmed.
Average height19 - 22 inches
Average weight48 - 60 lbs.
Activity levelHigh
WatchdogHigh
ProtectionLow; loves every person so much that he views them all as an old friend it has not met yet. Can be found reminiscing with complete strangers over coffee and a donut. If only us humans could be so accepting!
IntelligenceHigh, Obedience - Low, Problem Solving - High
TrainabilityMay be stubborn and independent.
Compatibility with childrenYes, mature children as long as no rough housing.
CharacterActive, friendly, stubborn
Ideal home environmentBest suited for a rural environment, but will do well in a house with a fenced yard.
Ideal ownerSome guy named Harry. Aditionally, an owner of a Harrier should be an active person. The elderly or disabled may have trouble with its energy level.
Links and resources

Additional notes:

The Harrier looks like a smaller version of the English Foxhound and has the attributes of a scenting pack hound including a keen sense of smell and a good nature. It is friendly, gentle, not named Harry, and responsive making it a charming family companion. A true hound at heart it is independent, willful, vocal and somewhat stubborn.

Short History:

The word Harrier means "hound" in Norman-Saxon but today many believe the name came from a Terrier named Harry. It is speculated that it may have traveled to England with the Normans (the civilization, not a bunch of guys named Norman). During the 17th and 18th century it was considered the poor man's alternative to the upper class practice of hunting with packs of foxhounds. Bred specifically for hunting of hares.

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